Transitional Treatment Center

The Transitional Treatment Center is a Phase I Transition (TTC) funded by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) whose structured environment follows the therapeutic community (TC) treatment model. The program is designed to provide a positive, safe, and caring setting offering education, support, and guidelines in assisting the ex-offender’s effective transition back into the community.

The rules and policies within the program are very much like those found in a functional family or living environment. Every effort is made to apply the rules fairly and consistently. This structure gives each resident the basis for acquiring positive social attitudes, values, and standards.

Empowering the individual to internalize learned recovery principles and live a life of harmonious balance is the program focus. The Transitional Treatment Center staff assists the individual(s) in establishing functional ties to family, friends, employment, and the community. The ultimate goal for residents at the Transitional Treatment Center is for each individual to grasp a successful recovery and to achieve their own personal hopes, dreams and goals.

Population Served/Client Base

BVCASA Residential Treatment Services house both male and female residents. All residents are referred by a State of Texas probation or parole office to either a Substance Abuse Felony Punishment Facility (SAFPF) or an In-Prison Therapeutic Community (ITC) that is organized and run by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ). These programs range anywhere from 6-9 months and consist of treatment services that are envisioned for all levels of adult chemically dependent offenders ranging from those who are non-violent and entering the system for the first time to those who have had long histories of prison incarceration and drug-related crime. These services are planned to be comprehensive and to continue into the community as incarcerated offenders re-entered the free world. The goal is to produce measurable reduction in the criminal justice workloads in Texas.


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